Man Crush Monday!

28 Sep


Photo(s) source(s): @st.jon504

She Did It!

21 Sep

Viola Davis made history after becoming the first black woman to win Lead Actress Drama Award at the Emmy. Congrats and thank you for being an inspiration.


Photo(s) source(s):

To Go Or Not To Go To The Salon? That Is The Question.

18 Sep

As much as I love my natural hair, sometimes I just don’t want to deal with it especially when it comes to wNatural-Hair-Hair-Salonash day. Sadly, it seems quite difficult to find people to do your hair without damaging it. Few years ago, I had a really bad hair experience at a hair salon. It was for New Year’s Eve. Like many women I wanted to look good to start the New Year. The outfit was sorted, the hair was the only missing piece of the puzzle. I just wanted straight hair for a change and decided to go to the salon so it could be done professionally. It started quite well. Washing…Good…Detangling…Good…Blowout…Erm not s
o good. I had to tell her what to do and what made it worse was that my hair at the back got burnt in the process. It just would not curl back anymore when
wet so had to wait for it to grow back. Despite this unfortunate “incident”, I decided to give salons another chance 2 years ago for a treatment which was good. It really moisturised my hair deeply but at the end, the hairstylist left me with three uneven cornrows on the head with my hair still wet. So I asked what she was going to do after…she said “It’s done.” Wait. What?! She explained that if I wanted something else I had to pay extra. The treatment was quite expensive so I would assume everything was included! Here again I told her to take out these cornrows and do a fro instead. Obviously, they never saw me again…

If you too had a bad hair experience or a really good one, please do not hesitate to share with us.

Photo(s) source(s): @dazziling_braids 

Need I Say more?

7 Sep


Photo(s) source(s): @rascamarao 

Braiding in Colombia

4 Aug

Afro-Colombian traditional hairstyle

In Colombia, traditions seem to be strong, especially when it comes to Afro-Colombian women braiding their hair. Ziomara Asprilla Garcia shared her story from when she learned to braid to her experience at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, where she showcased traditional hairstyles from Choco, Colombia. 

 Ziomara also explains the story behind Choco’s traditional hairstyles and the message behind them. Read more from the Washington Post >>here<<.



If You Know You Know…

27 Jul

She Is Killing It!

18 Jul


Photo(s) source(s): @calleysunshine

Is It A #HotMonday Or Not?

6 Jul


Photo(s) source(s): @dreadjourneyexclusive15

Inspiration Monday

15 Jun


This is for always being labeled as “ugly” or “angry”. Thank God, stereotypes are just opinions” by Kyemah McEntyre

Photo(s) source(s): @mindofkye


Queens Stand Up!

11 Jun

I am a queen, and I demand to be treated like a queen.

by Sheila Jackson Lee

So Fine!

7 Jun


Photo source(s): vintage.stoners


5 Jun


Photo source(s): @jorafrantzis

The Truth About The Natural Hair Movement

1 Jun

Society put a lot of pressure on women to look a certain way, act a certain way and even think a certain way.

Unfortunately, big-natural-hairthis pressure results in some women having insecurities about their bodies or having unbelievable expectations about themselves and to another extent about others as well.

For a long time, women with curly/kinky hair have been told that having natural hair isn’t beautiful. The issue here is that young girls are growing up believing that they MUST be someone else to be accepted. How can WE change that? How can we teach them to love themselves for who they are?

Well, I think that one of the goal of the natural hair movement is to empower women and girls. The “natural hair movement” as some like to call it started with few women (Afrobella is one of them) who decided to return to their natural hair texture showing that you do not have to stick to what’s society wants you to be. I see them as role models for younger generations and other women as well telling us to believe that we are enough. Ghandi was right when he said “You must be the change you want to see in the world.” Just look at the way big brands have started to cater to our needs, including L’Oréal and Pantene. Who would have thought this few years ago.

I can’t wait to see what’s next…

What are your views on the natural hair movement? Has it changed anything for you?

 Photo source(s): @kelbpics

Keep It Funky!

27 May

Source: TheChicNatural’s Youtube

Afro Hair & Beauty LIVE 2015

19 May

OSSAT-hair products

The countdown has begun only 6 days until the biggest and fiercest hair show in Europe dedicated to black beauty.
The Afro Hair & Beauty LIVE is opening its doors this bank holiday at the Business Design Centre, in Islington to showcase some of the best hair care brands and upcoming fashion brands.

Take advantage of this amazing weekend to see the latest product innovation for natural hair, including the premium natural hair care brand OSSAT. A new brand that helps softens, prevent breakage and shine. To find out more, visit them at stand 102 on the 24th and 25th of May  ;).

Afro Hair & Beauty LIVE is the place to be this weekend! Miss it, miss out!

Photo(s) source(s): OSSAT NATURALS

#HotMonday Is Here!

27 Apr


Photo(s) Source(s): @sergioespinal_

Ain’t Nobody Got Time For That!

16 Apr



Do It Yourself Natural Updo

9 Apr

Strong Is Beautiful

1 Apr



Photo(s) source(s): @nandimngoma

The Truth About Scalp Exfoliation

23 Mar

A while ago, I have attended a beauty event in London. I am not sure which one it was but it was for curly hair, makeup, fashion, plus other related things. Anyways, one of the stand really got my attention as it was performing scalp analysis. They were assessing the health of your scalp and telling you if it was dry, oily… A lady mentioned scalp exfoliation to get rid of the dead skin.

The first things that came to my mind was “Is it not what shampoo are made for?” “Why would you exfoliating your scalp?” “Is it going to damage my scalp or/and hair?” It left me a bit confused, so of course, I had to do a little research.

What I found out is that exfoliators are excellent for itchy scalp and to get rid of flakes.
Its a must have for people who over-wash their hair, since over-washing dries the scalp which in return increases the overproduction of oil. So exfoliating can decrease the need to wash your hair so much.
Exfoliators promote hair growth as well. How? By simply massaging the scalp and removing all the dirt from your scalp.

Here are few exfoliators available on the market.

ORS Stimulator Scalp Scrub


KIEHL’S Deep Micro-Exfoliating Scalp Treatment

jane-carter-scalp-renew.pngJane Carter Solution Scalp Renew


Would you consider using an exfoliator as part of your hair regimen? Have you tried one and would you recommend them? Tell us more below!


Photo(s) source(s):

Feels Like A #HotMonday

16 Mar



Photo(s) source(s): @westilllive

Colour Me Beautiful!

4 Mar


Source (s): @rogue_wayne

Boho Braided Style Tutorial

25 Feb

Step up your braid game with this simple and gorgeous hairstyle! 

Source (s): Mini Marley

Locks for ever? Not Really

17 Feb
Nothing last forever, not even locks! People think that when you decide to wear locks, you’re stuck with them forever, until you decide to shave them all off. Well, that’s not the case.
Dreadlocks is a very old hairstyle consisting of matted hair. It is worn by many naturals, women and men, and is not dedicated to Rastafarian ONLY.
You can achieve this hairstyle, in many different ways, but not washing your tresses for days is not one of them. The only thing you’re going to achieve is having unhealthy and smelly hair…
The techniques to create this hairstyle include: backcombing, comb coils, interlocking… Depending on your hair type, length and texture, the method should be adapted to get the best results.
If you want to remove your locks and avoid the clippers, check out these few tips.
What you will need:
– Water (use a spray bottle with a lot of water)
– Conditioner (optional)
– Something sharp, a needle, a rat-tail comb.. I have even seen people use forks. Hey if it works go for it!!
Wet one lock, then apply a generous amount of conditioner. Although, the conditioner is optional, some say it works better. It also moisturise and condition your hair at the same time.
Finally, with your chosen accessory, start combing the lock from tips to top. Do it bit by bit, as you want to retain as much hair as possible.
I won’t lie, it’s a LONGGG process, and there will be a lot of shredded hair but if you don’t want to cut off everything, it’s a good solution.
Check out this video and see how Libbaration does it.
Have you find any other way to remove off dreadlocks? Do you have any tips to remove them? Share with us.

Bad Hair?

24 Nov

Nothing annoys me more than when people refer to themselves or another as having ‘bad hair’. What does that even mean?  I have always taken the stance that everyone has ‘good hair’ but, there are many who have poor maintenance. This could be due to lack of knowledge of nurturing their hair or because their hair is over-processed by heat, products, chemicals etc.

Is it society that has placed ideologies of what hair perfection should look like in our minds? Or is it narrow-minded people who cannot see what beauty is beheld within the uniqueness of individuals?

How many times have you heard a phrase like, ‘I hope my baby gets coolie (Indian) hair’? Or, ‘Your hair is so nice, what are you mixed with?’ It is very disappointing that there are times when our hair cannot be embraced for what it is and its’ versatility celebrated, as opposed to it being a negative talking point – ‘Your hair is so  nappy, why don’t you just get a weave or a relaxer?’

We were all created differently and there are always methods you can use to make your natural hair easier to manage, without having to resort to following the so called ‘European’ standard. You should not have to change or manipulate your hair for it to be deemed as more acceptable, whether it be within a corporate environment or any other setting.

Ladies, let’s change this mindset of grading hair and just show encouragement for all. Remember, there is no guarantee for those luscious locks once we are old, so cherish what you have and just do you! Don’t worry about other people’s opinions, as we have but one life to live and it should be blessed with positivity, not worries about superficial things.

Art At Its’ Finest…

24 Nov


Source: Rebloggy

Mr. Handsome

17 Nov


Photo source: @nativepharaoh

Benefits Of Ayurvedic Herbs

14 Nov

Strong and healthy hair is the dream of every woman. Natural or relaxed, we all want good hair.

Ayurvedic herbs have long been used for hair care, especially in India, to get stronger and healthier hair. They can be found in different forms such as oil or powder. Henna is a well-known ayurvedic herb but it is not the only one.


Check out these other great herbs that can be added to your hair regimen.

Ayurvedic herbsAmla: It is an excellent conditioner to put some bounce back in your curls. Amla can also help for hair thickening and growth. You can also use it against dandruff, hair loss and irritated scalp. When used with henna, Amla helps town down the henna color.

Hibiscus: This plant is known as a hair growth booster which helps prevent split ends. It moisturises and conditions the hair.

Brahmi: It stimulates hair growth and treats scalp issues, including dandruff. It also gives a nice shine to your tresses. Its antioxidant properties enable the growth of healthy hair roots.

Neem: This herb is great, especially for the scalp, as it cleanses and acts as an anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and protein treatment. No more itchy and dry scalp.

Cassia: It is similar to henna, the difference is that it does not color dark hair. However, it will leave your mane healthier and stronger.

Shikakai: Great to cleanse the scalp and eliminate dandruff. This herb smoothes the hair strand and leaves the hair silky and shiny. Shikakai strengthens the hair from the roots.

Aritha: It is widely used in shampoos and is known to cleanse hair. It prevents alopecia and possesses anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties which reduce scalp issues and thickens hair.

Bhringraj: This ayurvedic herb helps restore the balance of the hair and prevents early graying. Used as a treatment it prevents hair loss and shedding. Thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties, Bhringraj improve the scalp’s health. For those who want to color their hair naturally, it is a great alternative.

Henna: click the link for more info.

How do you use them? Alone? In a mix? Share your experience.

Photo source:

What A Man…

10 Nov



Photo source: @sonofgoldie


Hello beautiful!

7 Nov


For The Ladies…

3 Nov


Now that I have your attention…

A new day means new opportunities…Have a great Monday! :) 

Photo source: @tmcfoto

Madam C.J. Walker (1867 – 1919) – Black History Month

20 Oct Source: NY Times

Depending on your neighbourhood, there will be a beauty salon, hairdressers or hair product shop available for you to get your must-have hair products. But where did the idea of selling black hair products on a mass scale come from? And who looked at this niche market as a means of basing a successful business on? The answer is Madam C.J. Walker.

Born on December 23rd 1867 into a family of sharecroppers, Walker was named Sarah Breedlove at birth and turned an uneducated background into a hair product dynasty that can be highly admired today. Her name which has been largely documented in history, derived from placing ‘Madam’ before her third husband’s name C.J. Walker.

In the 1890s, Walker suffered from scalp ailments so decided to create homemade remedies as well as, also using products from the Annie Malone brand – a black female entrepreneur at the time. From growing up in humble beginnings, Walker became a sales agent in 1905 for the Malone brand, after moving to Denver – the place in which she met and married her third husband.

After her name change, Walker decided to found her own business in which she sold a formula which helped heal and condition the scalp. It is said that the idea for Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower came to her by way of a dream she had and by looking at these pictures here, you can see why this product would have been so popular at this time. Some of the ingredients used in the formula had to be sent for in Africa but because of the her dream, Walker took the necessary steps to get them in her possession.


To promote her hair products, Walker travelled throughout heavily populated black areas in and sold door to door. In 1908, Walker opened the Lelia College (named after her daughter A’ Lelia) as a means of training hair culturists, to help people learn how to care for their hair. Walker hired Walker Agents to help sell her products on a wider scale and created a national association and cash incentives for them in order to instil loyalty amongst them; she also did not want to be the only one benefiting from her success.

Walker was widely acknowledged and recognised for her entrepreneurial skills and philanthropy, as she can be regarded as America’s first female, self-made millionaire.

With pinnacle women in our history such as Walker, we can pave the way for even stronger, ambitious women in the next generation.

Madam C.J. Walker…we salute you!

Dreadlocks Crush!

13 Oct

Sexy man with dreadlocks

Source: @theisrealites

Beauty Across Africa

11 Oct

In African cultures and traditions, your hair says a lot about you. The variety of hairstyles among tribes and regions is so rich and versatile that we had to put them in the spotlight.

A lot of styles that we are rocking today come from Africa, but there they are not only decorative but also symbolic. In some communities, the top of the head represents an entrance for spirits to access the soul. Hairstyling is so sacred that it is only done by trusted people, such as friends or relatives, as it could be used for witchcraft spells.  

According to your social status or gender the style will be different. Also, many styles symbolise a stage in

Mumuhuilas girls traditional hairstyles

Mumuhuilas girls traditional hairstyles

someone’s life, such as birth, puberty, marriage or death. For instance, girls and women of the Mumuhuila tribe in

Angola wear 4 or 6 plaits. Each style is structured and has a specific meaning. 

Hairstyling is a form of art realised mainly by women, who is passed from one generation to another. They spend many hours decorating and creating these hairstyles.  

Among the most popular hairstyles we can name braiding, threading and weaving which are still used today, all over the world. They are often embellished and protected with jewelleries, beads, clay or oil.

Check out these handsome hairstyles that the African continent has to offer! 

Sakalava woman

Sakalava woman

Young Zulu woman braiding hair

Zulu women

Fouta Djallon hairstyle

Woman from Fouta Djallon

Traditional hairstyle of Eritrean woman

Eritrean woman


Photos sources:

Voila Viola (Pinterest)

Eric Lafforgue (Flickr)

Sunday Grooming – Black History Month

5 Oct Source: Good Yard Hair Blog

During the 1800s, the product junkies that we have today would have been unheard of, as the slave trade meant that hair maintenance was left down to items that were readily available.

Bombarded with the mindset that straighter, longer hair was ‘good’ hair (otherwise known as the European look), many slaves took it upon themselves to experiment with goods that could be used for the same affect that relaxers gives us today. Some concoctions consisted of Lye mixed with potatoes, which often left the scalp burnt is not applied properly. Other methods of hair straightening, included oiling the hair and wrapping sections using pieces of material, not to dissimilar to the method ‘Banding’ that we use today. Many men also straightened their hair using a mixture of eggs, potatoes and Lye, which was known as a Conk. Conks were used up until the 1960s and could be done in the home or by a professional Barber.

The 1800s was a time when not as many ships carrying slaves were sent to America. This meant that slaves could not be worked as hard and came at a much higher price. Because of the hard hours enforced each week, slaves kept their hair wrapped up from Monday to Saturday in a rag, scarf or handkerchief. Sunday was the only day when slaves paid close attention to hair maintenance, as laws were introduced that allowed this day to be given as time off.

Hair was moisturised using the likes of butter, goose fat and other oils that could be located in the kitchen. To clean the hair, kerosene and cornmeal could be used, whilst coffee could be use to dye the hair naturally.

Contrary to belief, ‘wool’ hair as it was referred to by non African-Americans of this time, was was very soft and grew fairly long. This was due to the fact that the hair didn’t experience much manipulation and was kept covered for the majority of the time. Practices like low manipulation hairstyles can definitely be applied to lifestyles of today if we aim to promote healthy growing hair and with the use of the right products (natural or otherwise), our beautiful ‘good’ hair will definitely shine through.

Black History Month

1 Oct Source: Reunion Black Family

Hey Naturalistas!

Now that Black History Month is upon us (in the UK), make it count.

Take interest in a vibrant and thought-provoking history that is sadly forgotten about or referenced in our everyday lives.

Stay tuned for a month filled with Natural Pride’s take on black history.

Have A Little Patience…

27 Sep

…or maybe not? Most of us have been there. We want waist length hair within a 

month even though we have only just big chopped or we are not achieving that 

half inch of growth per month that the experts said we should have.


So what do you do when your patience is wearing thin and your on the brink of 

stepping back into the chemically treated side? Well word has it, you can now 

buy afro textured clip-ins to give you that boost you may be craving.



Kurly Klips offer customers afro hair using 100% Remy Human Hair. 

Take a look and let us know if you would rock these in your everyday routine.


Creativity Is Key

20 Sep

Hair styling does not have to be time consuming, especially when are lives are 

packed with work, kids and overall lifestyle. 

For those of you rocking a TWA (teeny weeny afro), word has it that there is a 

new ‘miracle’ product on the market. A good, plain ol’ sponge. 

Sponge you say? Yes! This household item has been making waves by allowing 

naturalistas with short hair to produce spiral-like curls without the hassle of

sitting for hours finger-coiling.


Check out proud2banurse’s tutorial for achieving this look…

Curls, beach & roller skates

20 Sep

Curls, beach & roller skates

 Source: @neeandra (Instagram) 


15 Sep

hot man with natural hair

Source: @ogsmoke92

Keeping It Versatile

8 Sep

If you ever decide to have a break from your fro or your dreads, check out Jasmine Rose’s technique to hiding big/long hair under a wig.

Remember, as versatile as natural hair is, we all want a break sometimes – enjoy!


Monday Crush!

25 Aug

Monday crush

Photo source: @mrdfowler

Hypnotic Curls!

23 Aug

Big curly hair

Photo source: @staceyhashh

How To Create An Elegant Braided Updo

22 Aug

Quick and chic updo for anyone looking for a new hairstyle.


19 Aug

Super cute

Hot Monday!

18 Aug

Good morning :)

Too Hot!!

11 Aug

Hot Monday natural hair

Photo source: @nappyheadartist 

As Nature Intended

9 Aug

Any naturals who read ingredients on hair products must have come across this ingredient: shea butter.

But do you really know what shea butter is? Do you know what its benefits are?

Shea butter

The shea nut comes from the shea tree which is mainly found in West Africa. The yellow natural butter, also known as Vitellaria paradoxa or Butyrospermum parkii, is traditionally handcrafted by the local population. The process to extraction is long and requires a lot of labour, indeed nuts are picked, boiled and crushed to obtain the oil.

It is often used for cosmetics products such as skin creams and soaps, for its hydrating, revitalising and protective qualities. Shea butter is also comestible and is used as a cooking oil in some African countries, such as Benin and Togo.

Apart from being a natural softening product for the hair, shea butter is high in vitamins, antioxidants and fatty acids which keep hair strong, smooth and healthy. Moreover, it is an excellent sealant to retain moisture in your tresses, so it must be used only after moisturising your tresses.

Is shea butter part of your regimen? Share your experience.

Photo source:


Braided Bun Hairstyle

5 Aug


Kenya Moore Shows Off Her Natural Hair!

2 Aug

NaturalPride Kenya Moore


NaturalPride Kenya Moore Real HairPretty long huh?

Measuring at a full 10 inches it seems as if weave protective styling is working wonders for Kenya.

Does this method work for you?

More scoop on Kenyas mane over at Wetpaint


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